Archive for the ‘Business Growth’ Category

Building Trust Through Social Media

Published by Suzanne Evans   |   February 12, 2015   |   No Comments

The use of social media has been a hot topic for business marketing for years now. Businesses are still trying to figure out the secret behind getting likes on Facebook, having followers on Twitter, getting people to comment on Instagram and so on.

Not only is it important to provide your followers with current and exciting content, but you have to do so while building their trust. Building social media campaigns can be daunting at first, especially for those who believe it’s okay to post without thinking twice, but taking a step back and looking at the bigger picture can be beneficial.

When beginning your social media campaigns keep these 10 tips in mind to keep your followers on their toes, coming back for more, and most importantly feeling they can trust you…

  1. Content: This is the number one way to build your followers trust. Be sure you are providing IMG_3404your clients with products and service that will provide value to them and your market.
  2. Build influences: Sponsor leaders in your community, promote your clients or fellow co-workers. Your followers will notice that you care to help others well building your own brand.
  3. Be human: Let your employees and customers share their story with your company, if you make a mistake live up to it. People make mistakes, but it’s the way you handle your mistakes that people will remember most.
  4. Say thank you: Don’t be afraid to acknowledge the help from others. Say thank you to your newest followers and say thank you to people sharing your content. A simple thank you can go a long way in the eyes of your followers. If you miss a thank you don’t sweat it, but try and recognize the people that help you out.
  5. Size doesn’t always matter: Building trust through social media involves building relationships. In this case its okay that you don’t have 84930248 friends on Facebook or 483904 followers on Twitter, build your following slowly and develop relationships with those followers.
  6. Design of your Website and Social Media Pages: Have you ever opened a website and the design was so terrible you immediately x-ed out of the box? A similar feeling happens with social media. If someone lands on your page and notices that it’s not user friendly or that you are not active they will leave the page and you will lose credibility.
  7. 80-20 Rule: 80% of your posts should be what your audience wants to know, enjoy, and learn to make their day better. 20% of your posts should be about what you do, what your selling and how your business can benefit your clients.
  8. Quick Customer Communication: If your clients know they can reach out to you on social media and expect an answer then provide them with one! Set a time limit that you want your company to respond back within. We use the 24 hour turn around policy during the work week.
  9. Always Keep Your Promises: If you are offering a product or promising to give out some pressing information, live up to that! You will instantly loose credibility if you offer your followers something and then never follow through. If you can’t keep your promises then don’t offer them.
  10. Have fun: Most importantly, HAVE FUN! Don’t be afraid to show your personal side, share stories, and have fun with the work. Not everyone wants to see hard core business posts every day.

Now don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone and begin planning your social media campaigns! Implement a little at a time and see what works best for your company. If you need some inspiration be sure to follow us on our various social media accounts!

Twitter @SuzanneEvans
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SuzanneEvansFans
Instagram @suzanneevanscoaching

 

Stephanie Coppola, Marketing Assistant 

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How to Conduct an Effective Workshop

Published by Suzanne Evans   |   January 22, 2015   |   No Comments

Every company I have ever worked with has had problems of some sort. Problems are caused by a variety of factors ranging from incompetence, weak management to growing pains. How companies react and deal with those problems determines how successful they will be. You can ignore them and hope they will work themselves out or you can take a systematic approach to eliminate them and take steps to ensure they don’t return. As the CEO or Owner, you should already know what these problems are but if you don’t, just ask your staff. Trust me, they know!

One of the most effective tools you have available to identify and correct problems is the Workshop.

An effective workshop will have you and your staff solving problems, owning the solutions, and implementing them enthusiastically.

This process is to be used anytime you have problems or issues to be resolved or improvements you need to make in your company. It gets the staff involved in the creation of the solutions and results in higher morale, enthusiasm and better and faster implementation.

1. Put up on the board the topic to be solved, i.e. “Things that are stopping our company from Growing”

2. Now ask everyone in attendance (if necessary, split into groups of 3-5 people) to write down the things they feel are stopping the company from growing. This process will get the participants owning the ideas and allows everyone to benefit from your top performers and best thinkers.Business meeting

3. Write down everyone’s idea on the whiteboard or flip chart. (You may end up with 10 to 15 after eliminating the duplicates). Discuss the items as you put them up. Clarify anything that’s not clear by asking questions. (What exactly did you mean by that? How specifically would that be done? So, what you are saying is … and so on.)

4. Get everyone to write down their top three ideas, from the list on the board, in the order of importance from 1 to 3.

5. Go around the room and ask each person (or group) for their top three choices and rating. Your goal is to find the three solutions that everyone agrees are the best.

6. Each person should now think of an assignment/task to integrate the top three ideas into the next week’s activities. Write these down. The assignment is designed to get everyone to implement the idea that week. (NEVER proceed to new tasks without first implementing.)

7. Ask for the ideas on implementation and write them on the board. Ask the group to now take the top three ideas and rank them as before. (See #4 and #5 above). Select the top three assignments and implementation strategies and give them to the group to implement.

8. Write a memo. Include the top three problems, solutions and implementation strategies (include the person responsible for any action relating to implementation). Circulate this amongst all staff and file the memo in a 3-ring binder divided by tabs for workshops in each key area.

9. Next week’s meeting: review the action and results. Discuss the newly created material: What worked, what has not and how can the various policies and procedures be improved.

10. File the memo and the notes from your review.

Lou Andruzzi, President 

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Hiring isn’t just about the resume….

Published by Suzanne Evans   |   December 18, 2014   |   No Comments

The hiring process is changing and it is definitely not a black and white process. Even the most Hell Yeah! resume and highest GPA are not going to guarantee that you are selecting the most qualified candidates.  You have to do the work on your end to make sure that you are choosing THE person that is going to best fit you and your team’s needs.

On-boarding a new team member is an investment of time, energy and money if it is being done right. The interview process is a two way street for the interviewer and the interviewee. Both of you should be asking and answering a lot of questions during this process and you should be meeting several times to ensure that it is a perfect fit for both parties. First impressions are often misleading. Take that extra time and demand the effort on their end to show you their commitment.

Think outside of the traditional process. How can you really get to know this person? One of the key points when hiring is to always remember that any one that is capable of learning can be taught skills and how to use software, but you cannot teach ????????????????????someone to have a likable personality or to have work ethic. Those are dynamics that can make or break your culture and your team environment. Challenge them to make a video to answer questions, Skype with them, give them a task list to complete that will directly pertain to their actual duties and responsibilities. This is a really good way to see their creativity and determine their dedication level for the opportunity to work with you and/or eliminate the lazy people. I absolutely loved this process of on boarding with SEC because it gave me an insight as to who I would be working with and what the standards would be. Set your expectations from the beginning and never let them lose their value.

Remember that you are going to be spending a lot of time with this person…. You had better make sure that you like them! Suzanne calls this the “Bed and Breakfast” test. If she and Melonie were ever stranded with any member of the team and were stuck in a bed and breakfast for the day with them…would they all survive? Personally…I would love to be stuck with them. Those girls know how to have a hellavah good time!

All of this hits home for me for several reasons. Six months ago I made the decision to leave a company that I had invested eleven years with to join Suzanne’s team. I was the “not-so-perfect” resume. My past work experience was mainly in operations management, sales and hospitality. Hell my actual title was Beverage Manager for a theater! Suzanne and Melonie took the time to listen to my story, my actual experience in my career and in my life. Never underestimate the power of experience. They took a risk on me based on my personality, work ethic and that I was a culture fit for their company. Every day I learn more and more. I continue to grow, reach and set new goals and I strive every day to become a greater asset to our team and to our clients. Why? Because I wanted it, I went for it and I prove myself every chance that I get.

Go out and find those people. Your team is a direct reflection of you, your company and your brand. Make sure it shines!

 

Sherry Young, Manager of Client Affairs 

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What Keeps You Motivated?

Published by Suzanne Evans   |   December 4, 2014   |   No Comments

During the HY Star event this past month, I remember an attendee asking Suzanne the question, “Once you achieve your goal, what keeps you going? What keeps you motivated?” I started answering the question to myself and was happy that it was a pretty similar answer to the one Suzanne gave. For me, my goals/dreams come, probably, in higher numbers than most people. I know a lot of people have the dream that they want to make ‘x’ amount of money in the next 5 years, have a family with ‘x’ kids, payoff their mortgage in this amount of time. For me, it’s always about the next video or film I’m working on, and for me, my goal is always the same – make the current project something better than the one before it. I think this particular goal translates well to almost any business or money-making endeavor one could take on. Always strive to make your next goal better than the one before it.

I’m lucky in the fact that filmmaking involves SO many different skills that there’s enough to keep me busy for the rest of my life. Now, filmmaking is a collaborative field, but that doesn’t mean I don’t want to learn everything about it. In fact, as hopefully all of you know, the leader of anything should know everything about everything involved. So for out latest project at Hell Yeah Studios, we’ve been working on a Christmas themed video to send out to everyone. I’ve always iStock_000032377448_Smallwanted to make a holiday-themed video and now I have the chance. Our editor/studio manager David wrote an awesome script and it’s up to me to produce it. I’m confident in my editing skills, I’m confident in my lighting skills, and I’m pretty confident in my shooting skills. But for this particular project, Grinch-themed as it is, we knew we were going to have to use prosthetic makeup…otherwise the whole thing would end up being a joke and a waste of my time, personally. Prior to this, I knew NOTHING about prosthetic makeup effects. Now, having gone through the process, I know enough to pull off a basic mold of someone’s face and having custom casts made – something I’d only seen on Mythbusters which went way over my head. I’m by no means an expert, but I at least now understand the concept and the time it takes to go through this process. And this is just one example of new things that I learned on this specific shoot.

So, to answer the attendee’s question, what keeps me motivated once I’ve achieved a previous goal? I simply have a desire to know everything I possibly can about the filmmaking process. Otherwise, how can I be a leader of an entire team when it comes to producing my own films? Once you commit yourself and your life to starting a business and achieving whatever goal you set for that business, you must be ready to learn EVERYTHING there is. Don’t go into it with the mindset that you’ll just “hire someone who knows how to do that” or that will “take care of all the stuff you don’t have any interest in doing”. If you don’t know anything about it and/or don’t know how to do it yourself, how will you know how to find the person that does? How will you be able to explain the duties of that job to a new employee?

 

Matt Robinson, Hell Yeah Studios Editor

 

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Teamwork Makes the Dream Work

Published by Suzanne Evans   |   July 17, 2014   |   No Comments

Teamwork makes the dreamwork.  And I am not just saying this because the quote sounds cool, but because its very true in the way Suzanne Evans Coaching is run on a daily basis.

I am 1 of 4 new kids on the block here in Murrells Inlet and although my title is Marketing Assistant I do more than just the marketing here.  I remember being asked when I was first interviewing if I was willing to help out with daily tasks around the office.  I like to think I can clean up after my self and help out where needed so of course I said I was willing to help out.  In the short time I have been working here I have noticed how willing everyone is to help each other out and get the work done.  Everyone in the office may have a different title and each individual may excel in different areas of expertise, but at the end of the day we are a team working towards a common goal. teamwork

We have a no man left behind kind of attitude in the office.  If a deadline needs to be met everyone is pitching in to help out.  When books needed to be sent out everyone had a stack in their office packaging and labeling while completing their own work.  When Be the Change welcome packets needed to be sent people stepped up, made goodie bags, and stuffed envelopes.  As Be the Change was in full swing everyone was pitching in wherever needed, no questions asked.

It’s not just the big things we help each other out with but the little things as well.  We take turns watching the front desk, answering phone calls, taking the garbage out, cleaning out the storage unit and so on.  Our office works best when everyone is working together.

If you feel your company or business if lacking in the teamwork department try implementing one of these simple tips…

  1. Hold daily meetings: Tell people what you are working on.  If a deadline needs to be met don’t hesitate to ask for some assistance.
  2. Offer assistance: If you see someone struggling or someone that has a lot on their plate offer your assistance. You may not be able to help that person, but simply offering to can go a long way.
  3. Dinners/Retreats: Spend time together outside of the office to get to know each other and see what makes each individual function.
  4. Create rewards or incentives: Don’t bribe your employees, but offer rewards for working together and getting the job done.  The reward could be as simple as a gift card for coffee or it could be getting out of work early.

Remember that building a strong team begins with trust and clear communication.  Now set your sights high and begin building!

Stephanie Coppola, Marketing Assistant 

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